TBS Home
Demos
teachers
parents
reviews
about us
contact us
buy
TBS Phone 01865-891191

 

" ZIM ZAM ZOUM is excellent, very successful. The children love it as it is so interactive...it also allows you to go at your own pace, suited to age group and ability, as you can pick and choose bits that are suitable "
Primary teacher, Monkton Park Primary School, Chippenham

star

" The songs just stick in your head ! .....we get to do it ourselves, it's like DIY...." Year 5 pupils, Monkton Park Primary School Chippenham

star

" ZIM ZAM ZOUM gives the children enthusiasm for the language, helps them to feel they are achieving and leaves them singing the songs for days! "
French teacher, The Dragon School, Oxford

star

" Zim Zam Zoum is brilliant! It makes people enjoy learning French. The singing is the best bit. " William, aged 6, Oxfordshire

star

" ZZZ is a fun and easy way to learn French at home and school. I love it ! "
William's Mum, Sally Fitchett

 

About Zim Zam Zoum

ZIM ZAM ZOUM !
What does it mean and where does it come from ?

Zim zam zoum’ is one of those engaging nonsense phrases that every language has developed to suggest the idea of change of state that takes but a second. It is not far off the English ‘hey presto !’ Or even ‘abracadabra!’ So its use often involves a notion of magic. However, French already has the word ‘abracadabra !’, so it can be argued that ‘Zim Zam Zoum’has a wider meaning or use.

The onomatopoeic quality of ‘Zim Zam Zoum’ lends it a buzzing connotation, which then suggests the image of flying (just as, indeed, ‘zoum’ immediately connects in English to ‘zoom’, which also conveys the notion of flying fast.) So in a children’s story in French you might say of a fly, or a bee, or indeed a witch or fairy: ‘ …elle s’envole et, Zim Zam Zoum, elle arrive……’.

Often with ‘Zim Zam Zoum’ there is the idea of swift movement from either one geographical place to another (‘Je monte dans le train et Zim Zam Zoum je suis à Paris ‘), or one time to another (‘Je suis une jeune fille de seize ans et Zim Zam Zoum me voici à quarante ans !’). However, Zim Zam Zoum does not have the counting and eliminating usage of rhymes such as ‘am, stram, gram’ or ‘eeny, meeny, miny, mo’

‘Zim Zam Zoum’ is also the name sometimes given to the well-known children’s game of Pierre-feuille-ciseaux (stone-paper-scissors). Known in different countries and regions by varying arrangements of these three words, this game has other names too, including Chifoumi, thought to be taken from the Japanese. The game of Chifoumi or Zim Zam Zoum is described below:

Le jeu de Zim Zam Zoum se joue à deux. Chaque joueur doit faire le choix de former de sa main ou la Pierre. Ou les Ciseaux ou la Feuille. Puisque les Ciseaux coupent la Feuille, la Feuille recouvre la Pierre et les Ciseaux se cassent sur la Pierre, le gagnant est celui qui a fait le bon choix. Printed below are some traditional French rondes and comptines which use either the phrase ‘Zim zam zoum’ or a slight variant, ‘Zim zoum zam’.

Turlututu
Turlututu, chapeau pointu
Tralalala, chapeau tout droit
Tralalalère, chapeau de travers
Tradériré, chapeau sur l'nez
Zim, zoum, zam, bonsoir madame
Zim, zoum, zam, bonsoir madame.

Si ton coeur Zim Zam Zoum*
Si ton coeur Zim zam zoum
Aime mon coeur Zim zam zoum
Comme mon coeur Zim zam zoum
Aime ton coeur Zim zam zoum,
Ton p'tit coeur Zim zam zoum
Mon p'tit coeur Zim zam zoum
Ne feront plus qu'un seul et même coeur
Zim zam zoum ! Zim zam zoum !

*Some versions of this traditional rhyme replace ‘Zim Zam Zoum’ with ‘zoum zoum zoum’

Comptine pour danser

Zim Zam Zoum Carillon*

Les enfants se mettent en deux lignes qui se font face. Les groupes doivent chanter
alternativement les couplets. Le groupe 1 choisit un enfant de l'autre groupe qui les rejoindra à la fin de la comptine. Dans leurs réponses le groupe 2 donne la couleur de la robe et des chaussures de l'enfant choisi.

Groupe 1: Ah! J'ai perdu ma fille, Zim Zam Zoum carillon
Ah! J'ai perdu ma fille, trois fleurs de la nation

Groupe 2: Où l'avez-vous perdue?, Zim Zam Zoum carillon
Où l'avez-vous perdue?, trois fleurs de la nation

Groupe 1 Je l'ai perdue dans l'bois, Zim Zam Zoum carillon
Je l'ai perdue dans l'bois, trois fleurs de la nation

Groupe 2: Quelle robe avait-elle?, Zim Zam Zoum carillon
Quelle robe avait-elle?, trois fleurs de la nation

Groupe 1: Elle avait une robe bleue, Zim Zam Zoum carillon
Elle avait une robe bleue, trois fleurs de la nation
(changer le bleu pour la couleur des vêtements du jeune choisi)

Groupe 2: Quelles chaussures avait-elle?, Zim Zam Zoum carillon
Quelles chaussures avait-elle?, trois fleurs de la nation

Groupe 1: Elle a des chaussures jaunes, Zim Zam Zoum carillon
Elle a des chaussures jaunes, trois fleurs de la nation
(changer le jaune pour la couleur des chaussures du jeune choisi)

Groupe 2: Comment s'appelait-elle?, Zim Zam Zoum carillon
Comment s'appelait-elle?, trois fleurs de la nation

Groupe 1 Elle s'appelait Marie, Zim Zam Zoum carillon
Elle s'appelait Marie, trois fleurs de la nation (remplacer "Marie" par le nom du jeune choisi, qui change alors de groupe et c'est encore le groupe 1 qui chante le couplet suivant)

Groupe 1 Ah! J'ai r'trouvé ma fille, Zim Zam Zoum carillon
Ah! J'ai r'troué ma fille, trois fleurs de la nation Le groupe 2 choisit un enfant du groupe 1 et recommence la chanson à partir du début. *Some versions of this traditional rhyme replace ‘Zim Zam Zoum’ with ‘zim zim’

Comptine pour jeu de doigts

Zim la boum, Zim Zam Zoum !

Le jardin
(toucher les cheveux)
Le trottoir
(toucher le front)
Les lumières
(toucher les yeux)
Les gouttières
(toucher le nez)
Le grand four
(toucher la bouche)
Le tambour
(toucher le ventre)
Zim la boum, zim zam zoum !
(taper sur le ventre)
Zim la boum, zim zam zoum !
(taper sur le ventre)